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In July of 2013, I wrote about my summer reading in the middle of the summer, when you still might have had the opportunity to read one of my recommendations as summer reading. Now, I realize that October is nearly over, and that in many places, summer is a distant memory (or a ray of sunshine at the end of the current school year tunnel) and fall is showing signs of becoming winter. So let’s call the books I’m about to tout suggestions for winter/weekend/whenever-you-can-squeeze-it-in reading. In that post from July of 2013, I quoted author Clare Vanderpool. Her words are worth repeating: “Good writing starts with good reading. And remember, variety is good. Read anything and everything from historical to contemporary, fantasy, science fiction and fairy tales. Learn from everything you read…”

 This year, as I offer some book recommendations from my summer reading, I want to add to Ms. Vanderpool’s wisdom a quote from science journalist and author Dan Hurley, from an article in The Guardian (Jan. 23, 2014) entitled, “Can Reading Make You Smarter?” I can almost hear your “Well, duh!” response to the title’s question, but stay with Mr. Hurley (and me) for a moment as he clarifies, “I spent three years interviewing psychologists and neuroscientists around the world, reviewing their studies and testing new methods they claim can increase intelligence. And while nobody would ever call reading a ‘new’ method for improving the mind, recent scientific studies have confirmed that reading and intelligence have a relationship so close as to be symbiotic.” He goes on in the article to suggest that this symbiotic (mutually beneficial) relationship between reading and intelligence is true for crystallized intelligence—“…the potpourri of knowledge that fills your brain,fluid intelligence—“…the ability to solve problems, understand things and detect meaningful pattern,” and emotional intelligence—“…the ability to accurately read and respond to your own and others’ feelings.” So I’m going to take this one STG step further, based on many years of working with student writers, and suggest that WRITING (particularly the traits of Ideas, Organization, and Voice) fits snugly into the symbiotic relationship between reading and intelligence (all three types). That’s right—it’s now a symbiotic relationship triangle. READING, WRITING, and INTELLIGENCE, each feeding and strengthening the other two! The perfect triad for your classroom, and for students of all ages!

So, here are a few books I heartily recommend (I believe you will like them and might even find a place for them in your classroom) for reading this fall, before or after raking leaves or between trick-or-treaters, this winter, before or after any long naps or between hosting holiday guests, and any time you can carve out a moment, such as with your morning coffee. Think of these suggestions as fuel for your symbiotic triangle to give you strength to feed your students’ hungry minds! As I suggested in July 2013, when you “Learn from everything you read,” it’s hard to keep it to yourself. 

 

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The Boundless. 2014. Kenneth Oppel. New York: Simon & Schuster. 332 pages.
Genre: Fiction—adventure blending history, folklore, and a bit of the fantastic
Ages: 10 and up (Grades 5—8)

Summary/Commentary
The Boundless is an adventure story of Titanic proportions and so is the titular train—the grandest, most luxurious train ever conceived. The Boundless is a rolling city, stretching for miles—987 cars, nearly 6,500 people, including young protagonist Will Everett and his father. This train has it all—a garden car, fountain car, a swimming pool, aquarium, cinema, to name a few. And this story has it all—avalanches, buffalo hunting, murder, a circus filled with amazing performers, feats of magic, sasquatches, and a crazy race/chase against time from one end of the train to the other. Cornelius Van Horne, the mastermind behind The Boundless, tells Will, who is desperate for adventure, “…it’s always good to have a story of your own.” Riding The Boundless provides Will with all the adventure he can handle and a whopping story of his own. Reading The Boundless will make you feel like you’re not only a passenger on the world’s biggest train but a part of Will’s fantastic story.

Excerpt:

                   Through the next door—and he’s suddenly in a garden as warm as a hothouse. Tall plants rise all around him. Birds shriek from the high glass ceiling. It smells like summer. Fairy lanterns light a paved path. He rushes past a burbling fountain.

                  Will Barrels on through the pungent fug of a cigar lounge. In the next car he slows down to cross the slippery deck of the swimming pool. The water flashes with color, and startled, he looks down to see all manner of exotic fish darting about. Peering harder, he realizes they’re contained in a shallow aquarium along the pool’s bottom.

                  He keeps going, past a small cinema and the smell of roasted almonds and popcorn…the train is endless, juddering, shuddering steaming along its steel road. (Pages 67-68)

Other books by Mr. Oppel:

Silverwing, Sunwing, Firewing, Darkwing

Airborn, Skybreaker, Starclimber

This Dark Endeavour, Such Wicked Intent

For more about Kenneth Oppel (his books, teaching guides, picture gallery, etc.):

www.kennethoppel.ca/

 

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Curiosity. 2014. Gary Blackwood. New York: Dial Books for Young Readers. 313 pages.

Genre:  Historical fiction/coming-of-age
Ages: 10 and up (Grades 5-8)

Summary/Commentary
It’s 1835, and twelve-year-old Rufus Goodspeed, frail and hunchbacked, is alone in Philadelphia with only his well-beyond-his-years, uncanny and eerily amazing chess skills to help him survive. His mother is dead, and his father is locked up in debtor’s prison. Rufus crosses paths with Johann Maelzel, mysterious purveyor and curator of “Automata, Dioramas, Curiosities,” including the world-famous mechanical chess player known as “The Turk” (a real-life chess playing automaton). With Rufus’ chess acumen and diminutive physique, he is a natural to slip inside The Turk’s cabinet and secretly manipulate the machinery. The Turk has wowed opponents and audiences around the world, while the truth about it’s human operator has remained a mystery. Rufus hopes his new job will help him to free his father, but Mr. Maelzel proves to be a shady character, with the will and means to do even the darkest of deeds to protect his moneymaking automaton from those (including Edgar Allan Poe) desiring to discover the truth.

Excerpt:

                   I’ll be the first to admit that I was a pampered, coddled child. In point of fact, I was spoiled quite rotten, both by my father and by Fiona, my Irish nanny. Mainly, I think, it was because I was such a sickly little fellow. According to my father, my birth was a hard one, and the doctors didn’t expect me to live an hour, let alone several years…

                  In some ways, I must have been a difficult child to love; in addition to being sick more often than not, I had a slight deformity of the spine—no doubt a result of being wrenched into the world by a doctor’s forceps. I was not a pint-sized Quasimodo, by any means, but I had a bit of a stoop. I think I must have looked like an old codger in need of a cane. (Pages 6-7)

Other books by Mr. Blackwood:

The Shakespeare Stealer, Shakespeare’s Scribe, Shakespeare’s Spy

The Year of the Hangman

Around the World in 100 Days

 

 

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Upside Down In The Middle Of Nowhere. 2014. Julie T. Lamana. San Francisco: Chronicle Books. 313 pages.

Genre: Historical fiction—the horrors of Hurricane Katrina (2005) and aftermath
Ages: 11 and up (Grades 4-8)

Summary/Commentary
Armani Curtis is so focused on her upcoming tenth birthday—party and weekend celebration—that she doesn’t want anything to get in the way of her important day. Not even clear warnings that a major storm is headed towards New Orleans’ Lower Ninth Ward where she lives and goes to school. Old Mr. Frank, Armani’s school bus driver warns her to watch the news because, “There’s a storm brewin’—a big one—out there in the Gulf.” She begs her brother, Georgie, not to tell their daddy that they had seen their neighbors, the Babinneauxes loading up suitcases preparing to evacuate “…’cause of the storm.” Hurricane Katrina doesn’t know or care about Armani’s birthday and hits the Lower Nines hard. Armani barely has time to be disappointed as Katrina’s terrible reality devastates her world, separating her from her parents and leaving her in charge of her two younger sisters. Author Lamana doesn’t pull many punches, giving readers a detailed, realistic sense of what it means to fight for survival as nature does her worst. Armani must be brave beyond her years while making life or death decisions and facing the loss of loved ones.

 

Excerpt:

                    I ran over and tore down the trash bag so I could see out the broken window. I couldn’t believe what I seen. That wall of churning black water was at least as tall as Daddy and was so close I could feel its heartbeat. I couldn’t stop staring at it. The loud, rumbling sound of the water monster filled my head.

                  “Armani!” Daddy yelled. He had me in this arms and was forcing me up the attic ladder. I was still wearing Memaw’s rubber boots and my feet kept slipping off the steps. Daddy’s body pressed against mine to keep me from falling.

                  I was almost to the top of the ladder when the front door and all of the windows exploded at the same time! A tidal wave came plowing into our house! (Pages 107-108)

 

This is Julie T. Lamana’s first novel.

 

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Colin Fischer. 2012. Ashley Edward Miller & Zack Stentz. New York: Razorbill—Penguin Group. 229 pages.

Genre: YA realistic fiction
Ages: 11 and up Grades 5-9

Summary/Commentary

Colin Fischer is fourteen years old, a high school freshman, a Sherlock Holmes uber-fan (he has a framed portrait of Mr. Holmes over his bed), has a photographic memory, and may know more about game theory, classic movies, and genetics (just a few of his areas of expertise) than anyone else, his age or older. He carries a well-worn “Notebook” (everywhere) for recording anything (or everything) about his daily life experiences. Colin also carries a set of “…flash cards, each with a different sort of face drawn on it, each carefully hand-labeled for proper identification: FRIENDLY. NERVOUS. HAPPY. SURPRISED. SHY. CRUEL…” These cards are Colin’s guides to reading and understanding the people he encounters. He suffers from Asperger’s syndrome, and besides from having a hard time reading people’s facial expressions, Colin can’t tolerate loud noises, and doesn’t like to be touched, even by his loving mother and father. When a gun goes off in his school cafeteria (no one is hurt) and Wayne Connelly is accused of bring the weapon to school, it falls on Colin and his keen observation/memory skills to prove Wayne’s innocence. Colin pursues justice for Wayne in spite of the fact that Wayne is a terrible bully who targets Colin from the first day of school.

Excerpt:

                   Colin handed Mr. Turrentine a carefully folded slip of paper—a note from his parents. Colin was counting on it to exempt him from PE class. Mr. Turrentine scanned the note once, then twice, his face perfectly blank.

                  “Asperger’s syndrome.” Mr. Turrentine pronounced the words slowly but correctly. When most people said it, it came out sounding like “Ass-burger” (an endless source of amusement to Colin’s younger brother and—until his mother put a stop to it—Danny’s preferred nickname for Colin), but Mr. Turrentine was careful to make the “s” sound more like a buzzing “z,” an artifact of the name’s Austrian origin.

                  “What the hell is that?”

                  “It’s a neurological condition related to autism,” Colin explained patiently. (Page 39)

This is the first book for these two authors, though they are experienced writers/producers for television and movies. Recent film credits include X-Men: First Class, and Thor.

Coming up on Gurus . . .

Vicki offers some wisdom, assistance, and classroom focus to those of you feeling a bit overwhelmed by the Common Core standards for writing. She will help you answer the question, “I’m not sure if I can teach everything, so what should I focus on?” We know you are busy, so thank you for stopping by, and as always, we hope you will come often and bring friends. Please remember . . . to book your own writing workshop featuring the 6 traits, Common Core Standards and the latest and greatest in young people’s literature, give us a call: 503-579-3034. Meantime . . . Give every child a voice.

Resources

Looking for writing lessons?
These resources were designed with YOU, the classroom teacher, in mind:

The Write Traits Classroom Kits ©2010 by Vicki Spandel and Jeff Hicks. These NEW edition kits are closely aligned with the Common Core Standards, and feature ready-to-go lessons that will make teaching conventions & presentation a breeze. Students love these lessons—you will, too. The kits are available for grades K through 8. To order or preview copies, please go to the following web address:

http://www.hmheducation.com/write-traits/. Here you can preview the kits (through 13 videos featuring Jeff and Vicki), download a comprehensive brochure, download articles on assessment, writing process or the Common Core, or order grade specific kits (Just go to the Home page, and click on the red order button.) Note: For the closest connection to the Common Core, be sure that your search takes you to the NEW Houghton Mifflin Harcourt home page for the kits, featuring our revised, Common Core aligned 2010 edition.

Creating Writers, 6th edition, by Vicki Spandel. This newly released edition will help you teach conventions with confidence and flair. It includes numerous lesson ideas, recommended handbooks, and other resources to help you bring conventions and presentation to life in your classroom. Connections to the Common Core Standards included. Find it at http://www.pearsonhighered.com/Spandel6e

 

 

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